Arthritis


GOOD FOODS
Arrey & Starr 2012

20 Most Common Anti-inflammatory foods,

This chart lists 20 foods that are anti-inflammatory and should be added to or adapted in your diet to help manage your arthritis.

FoodCategory Food Item Why inflammation decreases Cooking or Eating
Meat and alternatives Salmon Omega 3 fatty acids Poach, cook at low temperature
Anchovies Omega 3 fatty acids Avoid cooking at high temperatures
Walnuts Omega3 fatty acids; anti-oxidant minerals, vitamin E Add to salads, uses nut butter spread sprinkle on fruit
Almonds Antioxidant minerals, vitamin E Choose natural not blanched, to add fiber to the diet
Beans and lentils fibre, phytochemicals Soups stews, salads, use the flour in baked goods
Milk & milk products Yogurt and kefir Probiotics Add honey to yogurt for a great dessert
Vegetables Garlic family Phytochemicals: sulfides, thiols Raw or cooked; let sit before cooking or adding acid to preserve phytochemicals
Cabbage family. (broccoli cauliflower Phytochemical isothiocyanates Raw or steamed
Purple vegetables (cabbage& potatoes) Phytochemicals anthrocyanins, polyphenols Raw or steamed
Fruits Apples Phytochemica1 quercitin Raw or cooked
Blueberries Phytochemicals anthrocyanins Raw or cooked
Purple/red grapes Phytochemicals- -proantho-cyanins Raw or cooked
Herbs and spices Turmeric Phytochemical phenolic acid Dry or fresh raw or cooked
Ginger Phytochemical flavonols Dry or fresh raw or cooked
Cinnamon Phytocemica1 hydroxycinnamic acids Dry or fresh, raw or cooked
Beverages Green tea Phytochemical flavon-3-ols Hot or iced
Grape juice Phytochemical resveratrol Small amounts
Fats and oils Extra virgin olive oil Phytochemical tyrosol esters omega-3 fatty acids Do not overheat
Olives Phytochemical tyrosol esters omega-3 fatty acids, fibre
Avocado omega-3 fatty acids, fibre Raw

BAD FOODS
Arrey & Starr 2012

20 Most Common Pro-inflammatory foods,

This chart lists 20 foods that are pro-inflammatory and should be eliminated or substituted to help manage your arthritis.

Food Group Food item Why inflammation increases Substitute
Vegetables and fruits Watermelon High glycemic index Apples
Potatoes High glycemic index possibility of sensitivity Sweet potatoes
Grains White bread High glycemic index sensitivity to wheat proteins Whole-grain sourdough bread (no wheat)
Bagels High glycemic index; sensitivity to wheat proteins Whole-grain bagels(no wheat)
Granola High in sugar; sensitivity to wheat proteins Whole-grain cereal,oatmeal, or buckwheat,Porridge
Meats Hot dogs High in saturated fats Tofu dogs
Bacon High in saturated fats Canadian (back) bacon
Barbecued ribs High in saturated fats, sugar, and advanced glycation end products(AGEs) Braised brisket or pulled pork
Grilled steak High in AGEs Poached salmon
Dairy Cheddar cheese High in saturated fats; milk protein may cause sensit-ivity in some. Goat’s milk cheese
Cream High in saturated fats, milk cheeses protein may cause sensitivity cheese in some Creamy goat’s milkCoconut yoghurt
Milk High in saturated fats; milk protein may cause sensitivity in some Fortified almond beverage, fortified coconut milk
Ice cream High in saturated fats and sugar milk protein may cause sensitivity in some Sorbet with no sugar or sweetener added
Beverages Sodas High in sugar, no nutrition Water
Soda water High in acid, no nutrition Water
Fruit juice Concentrated source of sugars, calories Water or unsweetened tea
Fats Lard High in saturated fats Canola oil, olive oil
Sweets and sweeteners Jam High glycemic index; high in sugar Stewed fruit purée
Sugar High in concentrated sugar Honey
Candy High in sugar Fruit
Cake High in sugar; high in saturated fats Fruit-based desserts